Serious play describes the act of pursuing serious topics playfully. The Four Freedoms of Play, for example, provide one lens into how an attitude of playfulness and not taking oneself too seriously can promote motivation and flow, even on the challenges that matter most.

Spinning plates is a reference to one of the classic Richard Feynman stories, in which Richard Feynman becomes burned out after accomplishing so much in physics, then rediscovers what it’s like to enjoy physics by delighting playfully in solving a seemingly-unimportant physics problem.

Me

Since fall 2017, I work as a software engineer at Pilot.com. If our engineering team had a t-shirt, it would say “higher-order type theory and arguing with Quickbooks.” Pilot solves bookkeeping for startups and nonprofits. Read more about us in TechCrunch! It’s an amazing team, and we’re hiring.

Some talks I’ve given:

Before Pilot, I worked as a software engineer at Wave.com, helping make remittances to the developing world convenient and affordable.

In 2016, I finished my M.Eng. degree at MIT, with a concentration in theoretical computer science. My thesis research applied logical inference with SMT solvers to constructing models of cellular signaling pathways, and was presented at Static Analysis in Systems Biology. I collaborated with the Fontana Lab at Harvard Medical School, and was advised by Prof. Jean Yang.

I graduated from MIT in 2015 with a major in computer science and a minor in mathematics, then interned on the infrastructure team at Khan Academy. I have competed in the International Biology Olympiad and the International Linguistics Olympiad, and I have taught as an instructor at SPARC, at the USA Biology Olympiad, and at the USA Computing Olympiad.